Updating Results

Department of Transport

4.0
  • 1,000 - 50,000 employees

Application Process & Interviews at Department of Transport

7.9
7.9 rating for Recruitment, based on 17 reviews
Please describe the interview process and assessments.
The best I had done and was really clear/honest on who they wanted and what they were looking for.
Graduate, melbourne
Application -> Psychometric and other online testing -> Video interview (answering questions via video) -> Assessment Centre with activities, problem solving, and an interview.
Graduate, Melbourne
I was previously a vacation student and so had already been to an assessment centre and was not required to attend one for my graduate position. I sat in an interview with two interviewers who asked question that gauged how I conducted myself as a person and assessed my suitability to the role. Simple process
Graduate, Melbourne, Victoria
The process was quick and efficient. Assessments were more tailored to engineers. I found myself sitting on a table of engineers and I was the only business graduate. Regardless, I still raised other points of consideration to the assessments that engineers didn't.
Graduate
Very intensive. Assessment centre was very stress inducing with a group interview/presentation, individual interview and individual assessment. All other aspects of the process were fairly straightforward and easy to complete.
Graduate, Melbourne
Submit resume, cover letter and key selection criteria. Team leader assesses and invites you for an interview which consists of a panel of three members. Typically consisting of manager of position, someone from HR and another person within the business area you will be working for.
Graduate, Melbourne
* online application - submit CV and academic transcript, and answer some questions * online psychometric assessments (things like verbal, numerical reasoning, etc.) * pre-recorded video question responses * assessment centre which included one-on-one interview, and group activities.
Graduate, Melbourne
The process was pretty good, however there were a number of delays along the way.
Midlevel
Three main stages; Online psychometric tests, group interview at the assessment centre (specialized streams had additional specific knowledge base questions), final individual interview with the potential manager/team.
Midlevel, Melbourne
It was like most places I imagine, very straightforward, success in one interview then move onto the next. The questions I needed to answer allowed me to relate them to previous employment and university Situations.
Graduate, Ballarat
As a graduate, the hiring process was an assessment centre with multiple online assessments previously. It was rigorous and I believe half the battle was ensuring all the hurdles were complete.
Graduate, Melbourne
Interview process was on the same day as the assessment centre. Graduates were split into two; half to do the assessment centre and the other half to do individuals. Then the two groups would swap during the day. The day was made comfortable by talking to current graduates working at *VicRoads as well as fruit, biscuits, tea, coffee and lunch. Prior to that part, we had key selection criteria questions to answer, online psychometric testing that was "gamified" and a pre-recorded video interview.
Graduate, Melbourne
The government has a great interview process as the candidates can finish the one-to-one interview, written test and group exercise all together in one day. The networking time between the sessions was great, it really made me feel relaxed and the best part is all the candidates support each other.
Graduate, Melbourne
Long online multiple-choice assessment for the graduate program. The assessment centre included several group activities and a short interview with two managers. I also had a follow-up phone interview.
Graduate, Melbourne
It would have been good to have more of an idea of the timeline, but the process was generally good.
Graduate, Melbourne
Easy process and clear on where you were at.
Graduate, Melbourne
What questions were you asked in your interviews?
Those involved in interviewing myself were really honest and upfront.
Graduate, melbourne
I was asked to give examples of abilities.
Graduate, Melbourne, Victoria
* relevant experiences * interests outside of work * example of conflict resolution.
Graduate, Melbourne
Mostly standard behavioural questions (80%) and specific knowledge-based questions (20%).
Midlevel, Melbourne
The questions were based around values and work-related situations.
Graduate, Ballarat
I was asked standard behavioural questions - with nothing particularly out of the ordinary. It was about how you would react in certain situations, your working style, team-work style and just general overall questions regarding how you would fit in the department.
Graduate, Melbourne
Both interviews were not technical and rather assessed you as a person. The video interview involved general questions like why you want to work with us and moral situations. The in-person interview had us talk about our passions and difficult situations that we had been in and how we overcame and learnt from it.
Graduate, Melbourne
Why do you want to work for government?
Graduate, Melbourne
Situational questions "Describe a time when..."
Graduate, Melbourne
The usual behavioural questions that you'll get in government interviews. I think I got one on integrity, one on negotiation and a third one.
Graduate, Melbourne
Experiences with rail, interests and questions about work ethic.
Graduate, Melbourne CBD
Generally, morals and reasoning based on work experiences.
Graduate, Melbourne
Do you have any specific tips and advice for candidates applying to your company? How would you recommend they best prepare?
Be true to yourself and honest. Ask why you would like to join and list those reasons. If you don't know if you'll like it here, be honest about it. I was and managed to land a role regardless.
Graduate, melbourne
Be open an honest, do not try to be the model candidate. Be yourself, be confident.
Graduate, Melbourne
Be honest, undertake practice interviews, gather plenty of examples of displaying different abilities. Do research about the company, the role, who the employers are, etc. In the actual interview, don't be afraid to ask your own questions; you are interviewing them as much as they are interviewing you, if you reach a block, don't be afraid to ask for a minute to think about it or to come back to the question later. Take a copy of your resume and a notebook to take your own notes in the interview.
Graduate, Melbourne, Victoria
Do the prep work for the interview as the questions are fairly generic job interview-type questions. Also, step out of your comfort zone and try to show off your skills as much as possible as you won't be hired if you do not display any skills.
Graduate, Melbourne
All DoT work has a community focused outcome so approaching the questions from that perspective is a great way to answer questions. The roles I have worked in are very varied so showing adaptability is also another good point to make.
Graduate, Melbourne
In the graduate role, they mostly assess your soft skills and openness to learning.
Graduate, Melbourne
They think of everyday situations where they apply conflict management, communication and problem-solving skills.
Midlevel
Have good knowledge of some of the government policies, knowing two to three in depth will help.
Midlevel, Melbourne
Prepare for the interview by sourcing what questions may be asked and, most importantly, be yourself.
Graduate, Ballarat
As with all interviews, I think going in prepared with specific examples of how you have overcome challenges in the past is a good start. I don't think you would specifically need much knowledge about the department but showing a genuine level of interest and care is a good start. I think showing that you are open to change, learning and growth is really important as a graduate.
Graduate, Melbourne
The company is not too interested in your technical abilities after the first round of the process. Think about business, interpersonal and moral situations that you have faced and how you can apply STAR model responses.
Graduate, Melbourne
Passion is the key and it's better to do some research on the company/ the projects before applying.
Graduate, Melbourne
Bring all aspects of yourself to the table and practice situational interview questions with STAR format responses.
Graduate, Melbourne
Ensure that you understand what "behavioural questions" are and prepare a few STAR responses to a few questions related to the department values and the technical area that you are applying for.
Graduate, Melbourne
Know the organisation.
Graduate, Melbourne CBD
Understand the culture of the department (and former VicRoads and government in general) to get a vibe for the sorts of questions that will be asked.
Graduate, Melbourne